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Volume 358 - 36th International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC2019) - Highlight Talks
Results from IceCube
D. Williams* on behalf of the IceCube Collaboration
*corresponding author
Full text: pdf
Pre-published on: 2019 July 22
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Abstract
The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is the world's largest neutrino detector, instrumenting a cubic kilometer of ice at the geographic South Pole. The detector probes neutrino energies from GeV to PeV, and collects high statistics neutrino samples by virtue of its extremely large volume. IceCube was designed to detect high-energy neutrinos from potential cosmic ray acceleration sites such as active galactic nuclei, gamma ray bursts and supernova remnants. IceCube announced the detection of a diffuse flux of astrophysical neutrinos in 2013, including the highest energy neutrinos ever detected. IceCube has since developed a robust system of realtime alerts generated by astrophysical neutrino candidates that trigger rapid follow-up observations by other telescopes and detectors. In September 2017, IceCube observed a neutrino in coincidence with a flaring blazar, signaling the era of neutrino astronomy and widening the field of multi-messenger astronomy. The IceCube science program extends beyond multi-messenger astronomy to include the fundamental physics of neutrino oscillations and neutrino interactions with matter, cosmic ray physics, and searches for particles and forces beyond the Standard Model. This talk will cover the latest neutrino physics and astrophysics results from IceCube and future prospects for the detector.
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