PoS - Proceedings of Science
Volume 390 - 40th International Conference on High Energy physics (ICHEP2020) - Parallel: Dark Matter Detection
The Scintillating Bubble Chamber (SBC) Experiment for Dark Matter and Reactor CEvNS
P. Giampa* on behalf of the SBC Collaboration
*corresponding author
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Pre-published on: February 09, 2021
Published on:
Abstract
The Scintillating Bubble Chamber (SBC) experiment is a novel low-background technique aimed at detecting low-mass (0.7-7 GeV/c2) WIMP interactions and coherent scattering of reactor neutrinos (CEvNS). The detector consists of a quartz-jar filled with liquid Argon (LAr), which is spiked with O(100 ppm) of liquid Xenon (LXe) acting as a wavelength shifter. The target fluid is de-pressurized into a super-heated state by a mechanically controlled piston. Particles interacting with the LAr+100 ppm LXe can generate heat (bubbles) and scintillation light, depending on the energy intensity and density. The detector is further equipped with cameras to take pictures of the bubbles, Silicon-Photo-Multipliers to measure the scintillation light, and piezo-acoustic sensors to listen to the bubble’s formation. By combining these observables, the SBC detector is aiming to reach a threshold for nuclear recoils of 100 eV and a projected WIMP-sensitivity of 3.0x10$^{-43}$ cm$^{2}$, for a WIMP mass of 0.7 GeV/c$^{2}$.
In this paper, we will present the overall design of the SBC experiment and provide an update on the ongoing construction at the Fermilab site. Finally, we will discuss the collaboration’s plans for the SNOLAB installation/operation and the reactor CEvNS search. In this paper, we will present the overall design of the SBC experiment and provide an update on the ongoing construction at the Fermilab site. Finally, we will discuss the collaboration’s plans for the SNOLAB installation/operation and the reactor CEvNS search.
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